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Nuclear for synfuel and other non-power markets

Discourse on using nuclear heat in markets where direct electrification is infeasible or uneconomic should be directed to this thread.

2 thoughts on “Nuclear for synfuel and other non-power markets”

  1. A comment that I received:

    Here is a link – to new report: Missing Link to a Livable
    Climate: How Hydrogen-Enabled Synthetic Fuels Can Help Deliver the Paris Goals (September 2020).

    Featured on the front page of the Sunday Times, Business Green and World Nuclear News this report
    describes how the world can still meet the Paris goals of 1.5–2°C if sufficient, low-cost, clean
    hydrogen and synfuels are produced to replace oil and gas in shipping, aviation and industry.

    However, the amount of hydrogen required is far more than can be produced with renewables alone.
    For this reason, a new generation of advanced modular reactors will be required to produce enough
    climate-neutral fuel to displace the 100million barrels of oil that are currently consumed around
    the world each day.

    These new reactors will need to be very different from current large nuclear power plants, however.
    The report outlines how new shipyard manufacturing approaches can produce abundant clean hydrogen at a price that can outcompete fossil fuels within 10 years.

    The overall cost of this approach, the report reveals, is less than the existing investment that
    would otherwise be needed simply to maintain fossil fuel flows in future decades. The clean energy
    transition from oil to hydrogen- based fuels could be achieved with a global investment of $17
    trillion, spent over 30 years from 2020 to 2050. This is substantially lower than the $25 trillion
    investment the oil and gas industry expect to spend in order to maintain fossil fuels flows in
    future decades, and dramatically less than the $70 trillion investment that would be needed for
    an equivalent hydrogen strategy based only on wind and solar.

    1. Larry Greenwood

      J Lassiter:

      I’ve been looking for nuclear energy commentary that I can understand. And I’ve been looking for someone to dialogue with about it. I’m not interested in politics but rather the mere feasibility of nuclear energy and the various options available. Politically, the US seems unprepared to pursue nuclear energy, but that is simply a conclusion I reach by reading so much negativity about it. Maybe there is more openness to it than I realize. I’ve tried to read about Generation IV reactors and their progress, but have yet to appreciate what I’m reading. Are you a person that can help me out?

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